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9 Things That'll Make A Waiter Spit In Your Food

Nobody wants to be the customer everyone hates, but at one point or another, most of us have been. Because some part of us likes to think that when we go out to eat, they're there to serve us and we just get to sit there and stuff our faces until we're ready to walk away. Well, we went to a restaurant in New York City to ask a server (who asked to remain anonymous, for obvious reasons) for a list of things that customers do that make him want to spit in their food. The server didn't say if he'd actually ever spit in anyone's food, but try anything on this list, and we wouldn't hold it against him.

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10 of the Most Impressive Old Aqueducts

Aqueducts were built to bring a constant flow of water from distant sources into cities and towns, supplying public baths, fountains and private households. Many aqueducts over land connect points of similar height in a landscape, usually by bridging a river valley or other eroded opening in an otherwise flat area. This list describes the old aqueducts that were built in the period since the 1st century (Roman times) till the 19th century.

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9 Things You Didn’t Know About The Obamas

I've been covering the Obamas for five years for the New York Times, watching their transformation from promising Chicago couple to President and First Lady of the United States. Here are a few surprising things I learned about them, from my book “The Obamas,” out in paperback this week. By Election Day 2008, she was quietly contemplating sitting out the school year in Chicago with her daughters and moving over the summer. In retrospect, this shows just how new she was to the presidency: there’s no way the nation would have approved of a commuter First Lady. But her apprehension was also understandable, because living in the world’s most famous house-museum-military complex with two young kids is far more challenging than it looks.

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5 Unexpected Consequences Of The Aurora Shooting

As victims of the shootings in Aurora, Colorado continue to grapple with injuries and trauma, and more details leak about the alleged shooter James Holmes (who has reportedly exhibited odd behavior in jail, spitting at officers so often they've slapped a face guard on him), people in Colorado and around the country have responded to the massacre in surprising, sometimes distressing ways. From stocking up on guns to filing lawsuits against the theater where the shootings took place, here are 5 consequences of the shootings.

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10 Best New bars in the U.S.

When the conversation turns to cocktails, as it often does at Food & Wine, there’s one person we listen to loud and clear: Jim Meehan. He’s been called many things, including: Bartender of the Year; the bar manager at Manhattan’s outstanding PDT (a.k.a. the place that you walk through a phone booth, Bond-style, to enter); and Deputy Editor of Food & Wine's book series on cocktails. Because this is one of the best times in memory to be drinking great cocktails, we asked Meehan to pick his 10 favorite new spots in the U.S. He obliged.

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8 Concepts Fueled By Our Most Renewable Resource: Human Waste

We're kicking off Earth Week here at DVICE and what better way to kick off greener living than to point your attention to a renewable energy source you might not have had on your radar: human byproducts. Kindergarten jokes aside, there really are some weird gadgets and applications for human waste that you might have never heard of. Here are eight of the most fascinating uses, all that recycle the junk that comes out of our trunks.

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10 Scales Worth Posting an Article About

Tiny cannons, Mr. Tornado, and a fail-proof test for figuring out whether she likes you or like-likes you? Hold the page -scales just got interesting. In the early 19th century, Wilbur Scoville, an up-and-coming pharmacist from Connecticut, was hired to work on a muscle salve that used chili peppers to generate its punch. For some reason, the batches kept coming at different strengths. Scoville identified the problem immediately: No one had standardized the types and amounts of peppers being added to the mix.

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10 Things You May Not Know About The Solar System

My friend and colleague Dr. Victor Andersen of the Community College of Aurora, CO gave a talk called “Ten Things You May Not Know About the Solar System,” a bit in the sense of David Letterman’s Top Ten List. I thought it was a great talk and so decided to give my own commentary on Victor’s list. While the list is Victor’s, any errors are purely my own.

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9 City-Specific Foods To Try Before You Die

One of the best things about traveling to new places is sampling the cuisine of various locales. But some locales are more essential than others in the culinary department. Here are 9 dishes that purists will say can only be found in their respective cities – so if you’re a fan of checklists, remember that you’re only allowed to strike one if you’ve eaten it IN THE ACTUAL CITY. Sorry, but the National Coalition of Eating’s rulebook is very clear about this.

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5 Ways To Stop Bedbugs Before They Bite

Bedbugs are one souvenir you don't want to bring home. The National Pest Management Association's Vice President of Public Affairs, Missy Henriksen, shares the following tips for avoiding these pests while traveling.

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